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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
outside the u.s. >> reporter: anheuser-busch inbev offered to sell of it's interest in an importing arm to constellation brands and make the company the sole importer of corona beer for ten years. but the justice department says that solution does not go far enough. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: on wall street today, stocks finished lower on mixed news about the economy, and worries about tomorrow's important jobs report. jobless claims rose by 38,000, more than expected. consumer spending rose slightly in december, as personal income climbed 2.6%, the highest increase in eight years, on this last trading day of january, the dow lost almost 50 points, the nasdaq was unchanged, and the s&p fell about four points. despite the sell off today, january was a strong month for stocks. the dow surged 6%, its best january since 1994. a 4% gain on the nasdaq, and the s&p jumped 5%. on wall street, they say a big january for stocks usually means a big year as well, it's called the "january barometer." if stocks follow history, they could be up by 20% or more. will that hold true in
, working with our very own defense department, invented the internet in the first place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petitio
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)